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Online Resource List: Categories and Presenters


Click on a Category below to jump to that section.

  • Effective Classroom Practices
  • First Year Experience and Bridge Programs
  • Learning Communities
  • Tutoring and Supplemental Instruction
  • CTE and Contextualized Learning
  • Linking Student and Learning Support and Instruction
  • Assessment

  • Effective Classroom Practices

    Janet Fulks (Learning Theory and Neuroscience: Teaching Students to REALLY Learn)
    College: Bakersfield College
    Discipline: Biology and Education
    Contact Information: jfulks@bakersfieldcollege.edu or (661) 304-9641

    Background Statement: Dr. Janet Fulks has been part of the Basic Skills Initiative Project since Phase II. She has served as the ASCCC SLO and Accreditation Chair, Curriculum Chair, Basic Skills Chair and Noncredit Chair. She was the faculty representative on the ARCC Technical Assistance team, helped to develop and implement the CB 21 coding and training for all basic skills courses in the CCCs and organized noncredit faculty to address accountability issues in the noncredit world. Janet has been a part of two Hewlett Foundation Grants: Basic Skills Outcomes Capacity (BSOC) and Bridging Research Information and Culture (BRIC). Janet and her colleague Marcy Alancraig, from Cabrillo College, were the developers and editors of the Basic Skills Handbook. Combining her expertise in biology and her research in educational practices using scientific teaching strategies excite and motivate her teaching.

    Program Description:
    Integrating the latest brain research with effective teaching and student service practices has the power to direct strategies and build bridges to student success. Recent research elucidates how the brain learns, applies, recalls and scaffolds knowledge. This presentation describes how those findings can help faculty plan instruction and services that help developmental students achieve their academic potential.

    Cynthia Hicks (Introduction to Reading Apprenticeship: A Workshop for California Community College Teachers)
    College: Chabot College
    Discipline: Reading, English
    Contact Information: chicks@chabotcollege.edu

    Background Statement: Cindy Hicks has the following experience:
    1982-1985 Learning Center Coordinator, Monterey Peninsula College
    1987-1988 Reading Center Coordinator, Chabot College
    1992-1993 Basic Skills English coordinator, Title III, Chabot College, which involved integrating reading and writing in basic skills English courses and preparing for the Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum (WRAC) Center
    1999-2002 WRAC Center Coordinator, Chabot College
    2000-2001 President, Northern CA Writing Centers Association
    2005-2009 Learning Connection Project Development Coordinator, Chabot College; the Learning Connection includes an interdisciplinary tutoring center, the WRAC Center, the ESL Center, the Math Lab, the World Languages Center, a peer advisor program, and an supplemental instruction program. (All peer tutors at Chabot are hired and trained through the Learning Connection.) Integrating reading and writing at all levels in the English curriculum:
    1992-1993 Basic Skills English coordinator, Title III, Chabot College, which involved integrating reading and writing in basic skills English courses, as well as taking a "top-down approach" to academic reading and writing instruction: even in basic skills courses, students begin with reading college-level texts and writing essays. This approach has been written about in the Journal of Basic Writing. "Contextualizing" reading classes across the curriculum:
    1999 CalWORKS literacy coordinator, Chabot College, which involved piloting approaches to contextualizing literacy instruction into CTE classes.
    2007-present, participant in the Community College Literacy Research Group, West Ed, Strategic Literacy Initiative.
    2005-present, consultant and professional development facilitator, WestEd, Strategic Initiative, Community College/Reading Apprenticeship

    Program Description: The goal of this program is to introduce teachers across California community colleges to Reading Apprenticeship as a framework for content area literacy instruction in all departments and at all levels.  The workshop will be highly interacitve, with participants engaging in key inquiry activities designed to raise awareness of reading processes and generate discussion of appropriate supports for improving academic reading and learning.  Participants will receive infomation on summer 2010 professional development offerings in Reading Apprentice for community college teachers. Program Overview

    Jenny Simon (“Using Classroom Assessment Techniques (CATs)”)
    College: El Camino College
    Discipline: ESL
    Contact Information: jsimon@elcamino.edu or 310-660-3593, ext. 5187

    Background Statement: Jenny Simon, Ed.D., has been an ESL instructor at El Camino College for six years and the college’s SLO coordinator for four years.

    Effective Practice: In “How Do You Know What Your Students Know: Using Classroom Assessment Techniques,” the presenter will review a variety of classroom assessment techniques (Angelo and Cross, 1993) appropriate for the basic skills classroom.  The presenter will demonstrate three such assessment techniques in which the audience will participate.  Participants will get the opportunity to think of their own classrooms and design an assessment to use in their own teaching.

    Joan Cordova (“Creating an Active Learning Environment in Your Classroom”)
    College:  Orange Coast College
    Discipline: Mathematics
    Contact Information: jcordova@occ.cccd.edu  or 714-222-9047

    Background Statement: Joan Córdova has worked in both Phase II of the Basic Skills Initiative and as a BSI Project Coordinator in Phase III on a wide range of training activities. She developed the "Stand Up exercise" and is a contributing author for the Math Chapter in the Basic Skills Handbook. Joan was a founding member, officer and board member of CMC3- South. CMC3-S provides statewide professional development for community college math instructors.  Joan brings a wealth of experience as a Mathematics teacher in community colleges. She is currently an adjunct mathematics instructor at Orange Coast College with ongoing involvements in several statewide projects, including an Intersegmental Committee of the Academic Senate’s rewriting the Statement on Competencies in Mathematics Expected of Entering College Students , Basic Skills Initiative and Faculty Collaborations for Course Transformation.

    Effective Practice: The majority of college faculty teach their classes in lecture mode.  Research shows this is not the most effective method of learning for many of our students.  The constructivist theory of learning posits students learn by building on their current body of knowledge.  With this in mind, how then do instructors improve their students learning experience thereby increasing retention and success of their students?  Research shows one effective practice is the use of Active Learning Strategies which enhance an instructor’s lecture.  Active Learning Strategies include any activity that engages the student in cognitive processing of the course material.  Responses requiring thoughtful consideration of the question, writing a short response, group work, and full body response to material are some possible strategies.  The Active Learning Strategies session will model many strategies while exploring another dozen strategies. 


    Lynn Wright (“Addressing Multiple Learning Styles in Your Classroom”)
    College: Pasadena City College
    Discipline: English
    Contact Information: lmwright@pasadena.edu or 626-585-3047

    Background Statement: Dr. Lynn Wright, Pasadena City College’s Basic Skills Initiative Coordinator, will serve as faculty inquiry lead for the Lumina project. She has extensive experience teaching developmental English as well as developing, managing, and evaluating programs for basic skills students; from 2004-7 Dr. Wright was program director for the TLC’s Title V Coop.  She is an active participant in local, state, and national dialogues concerning basic skills education, and, specifically, summer bridge/first-year experience programs and professional development activities. She has presented extensively (individually and with Dr. Klein) at conferences and workshops and is currently on the California Chancellors’ Office Action Planning Group for the Basic Skills Initiative. 

    Effective Practice: Multiple Intelligences and Learning Styles is an interactive presentation; participants learn about the concept of multiple intelligences and learning style methods designed to engage our students and improve their learning. One outcome for the session is for participants to design a lesson plan and corresponding assessment that incorporates these varied learning techniques.


    Aaron Malchow (Collaborative Learning and Assessment) 
    College: Mission College
    Discipline: English Composition and Reading
    Contact Information: aaron_malchow@wvm.edu or 408-855-5370

    Background Statement: Aaron Malchow is a Reading Instructor at Mission College in Santa Clara. His background is in English Composition and Reading, and he has taught developmental, Freshman, and Sophomore English, as well as developmental and college-level Reading courses.

    Effective Practice: Like most instructors, I have been interested in how to develop student ownership in their class work. Not just responsibility for what they do in the classroom, but also awareness of how they are active agents in their learning. To this end, I have developed a process wherein students develop student-based rubrics for each concept that they learn in class, allowing them to map out what they need to learn, to establish criteria for measuring their learning, and to determine why the learning is important to them. These rubrics are measured against professionally designed rubrics, in order to establish professional criteria, but the students do this work independent of those professional rubrics. As an instructor who has disliked rubrics up to this point, I have been surprised at the student success rates I have achieved, as well as the wealth of student data I have collected.  This practice allows me to evaluate not just their performance, but also their metacognitive awareness, while identifying the sources of success and difficulty in completing assignments.

     


    First Year Experience and Bridge Programs

    Lynn Wright, Brock Klein (The .XL Summer Bridge/First-Year Experience Program and Summer Math Jams)
    College: Pasadena City College
    Discipline: Dr. Lynn Wright, English; Dr. Brock Klein, director, Teaching and Learning Center
    Contact Information: Lynn Wright, lmwright@pasadena.edu or 626-585-3047; Brock Klein, bmklein@pasadena.edu

    Background Statements: Dr. Lynn Wright, Pasadena City College’s Basic Skills Initiative Coordinator, will serve as faculty inquiry lead for the Lumina project. She has extensive experience teaching developmental English as well as developing, managing, and evaluating programs for basic skills students; from 2004-7 Dr. Wright was program director for the TLC’s Title V Coop.  She is an active participant in local, state, and national dialogues concerning basic skills education, and, specifically, summer bridge/first-year experience programs and professional development activities. She has presented extensively (individually and with Dr. Klein) at conferences and workshops and is currently on the California Chancellors’ Office Action Planning Group for the Basic Skills Initiative.  Dr. Brock Klein is director of Pasadena City College’s Teaching and Learning Center (TLC), which is committed to helping under-prepared, first-generation college students move successfully from basic skills to transfer-level courses.  Dr. Klein developed the TLC in 2000 with funds from a US Department of Education Title V grant and has since managed the college’s grants from the Hewlett/Carnegie Foundations, “Strengthening Pre-Collegiate Education in Community Colleges” (SPECC), and the Irvine Foundation, “Student Support Partnership Integrating Resources and Education” (SSPIRE).  He has presented extensively on basic skills education and specifically on program design, management, evaluation and professional development in California (e.g., the UC Berkeley Tillery Institute, Hewlett Foundation, Student Success Conference), nationally (Achieving the Dream, American Association of  Community Colleges) and internationally (International Society for the Scholarship of Teaching and Learning). Dr. Klein is currently involved in the creation of California’s Basic Skills Initiative Leadership Institute and Regional Learning Networks.

    Program Description: Lynn and Brock have over eight years’ experience developing and running summer bridges and first-year experience programs. Their .XL First-Year Experience Program's holistic approach helps under-prepared, first-generation college students move successfully from basic skills to transfer courses through collaboration and community-building activities. Variations on this program are “Jams,” including the popular Math Jam, a two-week, no-credit summer program that provides orientation to college and essential study skills with a mathematics brush-up in a fun and interactive approach.


    Matt Cheung, Cynthia Mosqueda (First Year Experience Program)
    College: El Camino
    Discipline: Matt Cheung, English; Cynthia Mosqueda, Counseling
    Contact Information: Matt Cheung, mcheung@elcamino.edu or 310-660-3593, ext. 3689; Cynthia Mosqueda,  cmosqueda@elcamino.edu or 310-660-3593 ext. 3075

    Background Statements: Matt Cheung teaches English at El Camino College.  He has been involved in the First Year Experience Program since 2005.  Along with his duties as an English instructor, he also assists with faculty development within the FYE program.  Cynthia Mosqueda is the faculty coordinator for the First Year Experience/Learning Communities Program (FYE) at El Camino College. She has a Master’s degree in Counseling and is currently a doctoral candidate at UCLA in the Educational Leadership Program. Cynthia helped to start FYE in 2000 with only a small cohort of 45 students. Today, over 750 students are enrolled in learning communities through the First Year Experience Program. The program has received national recognition through Excelencia in Education, a research-based organization housed in Washington D.C. Most recently, El Camino College nominated the program for the Academic Senate Exemplary Program Award within the state. The program has over 9 1/2 years of data that has measured student success, persistence, course progression, and retention rates for FYE students. FYE students have continually outperformed their comparison cohorts at ever measure.  Syracuse researcher, lecturer, and speaker Vince Tinto has published findings about the program among best practices for community colleges. Cynthia is currently conducting her doctoral study through UCLA and examining the relationship between participation in a First Year Experience Program and transfer readiness. 

    Program Description: Presentations will discuss the learning community model utilized by El Camino’s First Year Experience Program.  The FYE program at El Camino started in 2000 with the goal of helping high school students transition into college life.  Today, it helps over 900 students reach their goal of transferring.  Any presentations will discuss this program at length, its administrative and faculty components, along with steps and ways to begin a similar program at different campuses.


    Diego James Navarro (Digital Bridge Academy)
    College: Cabrillo College
    Discipline: Business, English, Language Arts
    Contact Information: diego@cabrillo.edu / 831-477-3255

    Background Statement: Diego is full-time instructor and serves on the Faculty Senate at Cabrillo College in Santa Cruz County.  He is the founder of the Digital Bridge Academy (DBA), which serves under-prepared students. The DBA has been adopted by three other California community colleges, and has garnered national attention for its effective practices.  Diego has been teaching at Cabrillo College since 2002. Diego has provided workshops to colleges, conferences and research institutes on topics like integrated instruction, accelerated learning, experiential learning, addressing the needs of at-risk students, and reconceptualizing the traditional developmental educational model. His workshops have ranged from 2 hours to two weeks long. His five day DBA Faculty Experiential Learning Institute has been attended by hundreds of community college faculty.

    Program Description: The Digital Bridge Academy (DBA) is a semester-long transformative learning environment focused on academics and self-efficacy. The program is a comprehensive program which provides community colleges with an alternative to traditional sequenced remediation courses that too often lead students to drop out before achieving their academic goals. DBA “bridges” cohorts of up to 29 students into regular community college courses by providing a full-time, Students first complete the Foundation Course, an intensive, two-week, 58-hour course designed to “light the fire for learning.” Using curriculum approaches adapted from graduate and corporate management education, students examine the educational experiences and personal challenges that have influenced their prior academic performance. The Foundation Course is followed by a 13-week, full-time Bridge Semester comprised of a Team Self-Management (TSM) Course that reinforces professional behaviors combined with integrated academic courses that are accelerated and contextualized. These courses include a social justice primary research course or comparable project-based course related to students’ career paths, courses providing computer skills, career planning, and movement, and will soon include accelerated English instruction (a one-level-below transfer English course) and an accelerated math course. All courses are offered by faculty trained in the DBA approach using curriculum that is contextualized and integrated across the curriculum to provide students with “just in time” instruction as they proceed through the DBA semester. 

    DBA’s goal for unprepared students is to: (1) increase their retention by accelerating them through developmental education courses, (2) prepare them to enroll in and complete the gatekeeper courses to postsecondary education (intermediate algebra, transfer-level English, or the math and English required by Career Technical Education (CTE) certificate programs) and (3) increase the likelihood they will complete their community college degree or certificate programs and/or transfer to four-year colleges or universities. The DBA has been recently evaluated by Columbia University’s Community College Research Center in addition to evaluations funded by the National Science Foundation.

    Jennifer Vega La Serna (First Year Experience Program)
    College: College of the Sequoias
    Discipline:  Dean, Arts and Letters
    Contact Information:  jenniferl@cos.edu or 559-730-3735

    Background Statement:  Dr. Jennifer Vega La Serna is the Dean of Arts and Letters at the College of the Sequoias where she also serves as administrator for the basic skills initiative and director of the Title V HSI grant. Through the Title V HSI grant, the College is re-envisioning the First Year Experience program and developing a Second Year Experience program. Dr. La Serna is a member of the COS First Year Experience Council and has been active in designing and implementing the FYE program. She has extensive teaching experience in English as a Second Language, teacher training and developing and managing basic skills programs. She received her Ph.D. from the University of Southern California in Education Policy Planning and Administration with a specialization in International and Intercultural Education and an MS in Teaching English as a Second Language. Prior to joining COS in 2007, she served as the Director of the Ronald E. McNair Post-baccalaureate Achievement Program at CSU Dominguez Hills and as a Senior Education Specialist for the City of Los Angeles.

    Program Description:  “Addressing the Needs of a Diverse Student Population through a First Year Experience Program” will share insights into the genesis of our First Year Experience (FYE) program and our planning process at College of the Sequoias.  Included will be general information about our geographic area and challenges we have with our student population. The evolution and the format of the program will be discussed, including the Learning Communities and First Year Experience Seminar; FYE Academic challenges, expansion plan to address all new students; FYE student and faculty recruitment processes; efforts to combine FYE with the Basic Skills initiative; data collected on student success and retention; and future plans for the program.


    Learning Communities

    Allison Tom-Miura (Utilities and Construction Prep Program)
    College: LA Trade Tech
    Discipline: Counseling
    Contact Information: TommiuAJ@lattc.edu

    Background Statement: Allison Tom-Miura is a counselor at LA Trade Tech and leads the Utilities and Construction Prep Program.

    Program Description: The Utilities and Construction Prep Program is a 12-week intensive college and workforce readiness training program that addresses basic skills in math and English, applied construction skills, industry overview and career opportunities, employment readiness, teamwork, leadership, and financial literacy in the context of preparing for careers in the construction trades or utility sectors. Using a cohort-based learning community, the program includes broad outreach to disconnected and under prepared and un/underemployed adults. The program is the result of the work of an industry-driven collaborative that includes faculty, major employers, labor unions and workforce agencies. Upon completion, students are ready to move into employment, as well as to continue in educational programs to obtain certificates or degrees.


    Sue Jensen (Project Success Learning Communities)
    College: Grossmont College
    Discipline: Reading
    Contact Information: sue.jensen@gcccd.edu or 619-644-7493

    Background Statement: Sue Jensen’s interests have always been with students.  Her first teaching assignment, a ten-year stint at Lincoln High School in San Diego, was both challenging and rewarding.  She became actively involved in programs she hoped would support her students.  Primarily, this meant creating a reading program.   She also participated in the San Diego Area Writing Project and developed numerous curriculum projects under the auspices of Title 1.  The second leg of her career was as an adjunct instructor at San Diego State.  She taught in the Writing and Rhetoric Department, but also co-chaired Writing Across the Curriculum workshops for teachers in the San Diego Unified School District. With the offer of a full-time position at Grossmont College, she returned to the teaching of reading, her first love.  Since 1984, she has helped develop Project Success, the learning communities program at Grossmont.  Since 1995, she has acted as the coordinator of Project Success.  These learning communities link courses at the basic skills level, but also courses at the transfer level as well as honors courses.   For the last year, she has acted as the co-chair of the Student Success Committee.  She is also a founding member of the California Learning Communities Consortium; she has served as a mentor for the Washington Center's Learning Communities Summer Institute; and she has conducted workshops nationwide to institutions interested in developing learning communities, specifically developmental learning communities, on their campuses. 

    Program Description: Project Success, Grossmont's twenty-five year old learning community program, is comprised of 35-40 links, serving from 900-1000 students each semester.  Approximately two-thirds of these links are developmental writing courses linked to reading courses.  Some of those links include math and/or personal development courses as well.  We are also building contextualized links of developmental writing, reading, and math for students interested in our Nursing program.  Other links contextualized for specific career pathways  (AOJ, Child Development, Office Professional Training) are in development.  The remainder of the links consists of Freshman English composition courses paired with other general education courses:  Anthropology, History, Math, Science, Humanities, etc. 

    Project Success was built without grant money or other college funds.  The only reassigned time given to the Project is to the coordinator.  Yet we have carefully crafted a mentoring process to bring faculty, both full-time and adjunct, into the program and are able to retain those faculty semester after semester.  Their creative collaborations are a testament to their dedication to our students.  They maximize student success through the development of coordinated syllabi, through the sharing of course goals and curriculum content, through the selection of fiction and non-fiction readings, and through classroom activities.  Many of the partners have teamed for years and their course integration has become sophisticated as well as challenging and motivating for our students.  And the beauty of the program is their willingness to share what they have developed with new instructors to the program. 

    The latest ARCC data indicates that students in our developmental links have a success rate (C or better) of 70%.  Students in comparable stand-alone writing courses have a 50% success rate.


    Teresa Aldredge (Diop Scholars Program)
    College: Cosumnes River College
    Discipline: Counseling
    Contact Information: aldredt@crc.losrios.edu or 916-691-7368

    Background Statement: Teresa Aldredge is a Diop Scholars counselor and professor, with twenty-five years in student support services and eighteen years as a community college counselor.  She is Vice Chair, Program Development, for the Umoja Community of California Community Colleges.

    Program Description: The Umoja Community of California Community Colleges is designed to promote the success of underprepared and disadvantaged students in the California Community College system.  Umoja Community utilizes culturally responsive pedagogy and practices particularly effective for working with African American and other students.  Colleges from across the state are gearing up to start Umoja Community programs to help our students achieve their educational goal.  Come hear about how these different learning strategies works in a community.  Presentation topics include the following: Intrusive Counseling Techniques; Creating an Inclusive Classroom Environment; How to Start an Umoja Community Program.

     


    Tutoring and Supplemental Instruction

    Jerry Pike (Partnership for Student Success)
    College: Santa Barbara City College
    Discipline: English, Learning Support
    Contact Information: Pike@sbcc.edu or 805-965-0581, ext. 2673

    Background Statement: Dr. Pike is currently the Director of Learning Support Services at Santa Barbara City College. Early in his teaching career he ran the Writing Center at CSU, Chico which included training graduate student tutors. He earned a PhD in American Literature from UC Davis where he taught for several years. At Davis he also taught and oversaw graduate students who were new teachers of English. Dr. Pike came to Santa Barbara City College in 1991 where he taught English, worked as Director of Composition and then moved to his current position, which includes directing the Learning Skills Center, teaching and training tutors, coordinating Directed Learning Activities development, offering learning skills workshops, and working with students and faculty to foster individualized learning. He also oversees learning technology to supplement and complement instruction. He is a founding member of SBCC’s Partnership for Student Success beginning in 2005.

    Program Descriptions: This workshop examines SBCC’s Partnership for Student Success as a model that can be exported to other campuses, establishing principles for gaining cross-disciplinary involvement and support from students, faculty, and administration. The Partnership has been very successful at SBCC in large part because it is founded upon an inclusive, non-competitive, cross-disciplinary model. One of the Partnership’s goals includes breaking down the “silo effect” by developing shared strategies in the provision of foundational skills across disciplines. The goal of Dr. Pike’s workshop is that participants will contribute to a shared understanding of guiding principles that are transferable to the participants’ home campuses. The workshop is interactive and participants leave with a declared plan for implementation, including “first steps.” 

    A related workshop, Effective Practices in the Writing Center, illustrates the steps taken at the SBCC Writing Center that have dramatically enhanced the consistency and quality of assistance to students. The workshop shares documents and procedures that encourage students to take responsibility for their own writing, while assisting tutors in efficiently and effectively setting goals with students, recording tutoring sessions, informing faculty of work completed and setting “next steps” for students. The model empowers students and tutors, and moves away from the old infirmary model of student assistance.  The goal of Dr. Pike’s workshop is that participants will contribute to a shared understanding of guiding principles that are transferable to the participants’ home campuses. The workshop is interactive and participants leave with a declared plan for implementation, including “first steps.” 

    Cynthia Hicks (Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum Center to the Learning Connection)
    College: Chabot College
    Discipline: Reading, English
    Contact Information: chicks@chabotcollege.edu

    Background Statement: Cindy Hicks has the following experience:
    1982-1985  Learning Center Coordinator, Monterey Peninsula College
    1987-1988  Reading Center Coordinator, Chabot College
    1992-1993 Basic Skills English coordinator, Title III, Chabot College, which  involved integrating reading and writing in basic skills English courses and preparing for the Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum (WRAC) Center
    1999-2002 WRAC Center Coordinator, Chabot College
    2000-2001 President, Northern CA Writing Centers Association
    2005-2009 Learning Connection Project Development Coordinator, Chabot College; the Learning Connection includes an interdisciplinary tutoring center, the WRAC Center, the ESL Center, the Math Lab, the World Languages Center, a peer advisor program, and an supplemental instruction program. (All peer tutors at Chabot are hired and trained through the Learning Connection.) Integrating reading and writing at all levels in the English curriculum:
    1992-1993 Basic Skills English coordinator, Title III, Chabot College, which involved integrating reading and writing in basic skills English courses, as well as taking a "top-down approach" to academic reading and writing instruction: even in basic skills courses, students begin with reading college-level texts and writing essays. This approach has been written about in the Journal of Basic Writing. "Contextualizing" reading classes across the curriculum:
    1999 CalWORKS literacy coordinator, Chabot College, which involved piloting approaches to contextualizing literacy instruction into CTE classes.
    2007-present, participant in the Community College Literacy Research Group, West Ed, Strategic Literacy Initiative.
    2005-present, consultant and professional development facilitator, WestEd, Strategic Initiative, Community College/Reading Apprenticeship

    Program Description: In the late 1980's, Chabot College added Reading to our WAC program, to make it Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum.  We began inviting colleagues from across the state to come share with us their work on reading across the curriculum as well as writing across the curriculum.  With funds from a Title III grant in 1992, we combined our Reading Center and our Writing Center into a Writing and Reading Across the Curriculum Center, where students can drop in to meet with peer tutors or make an appointment to meet with instructors from a variety of disciplines for support on any of their college reading and writing.  This was also the time we integrated reading and writing in all of our English classes, so that even our basic skills classes are "Reading, Reasoning, and Writing" courses that engage students with reading full- length texts and writing essays.  Finally, we reduced the number of basic skills English classes, offering now a two-semester sequence or a one-semester option prior to English 1A.  Students may select either option.  This presentation will elaborate on the history and the building of the Chabot College basic skills English curriculum and discuss how the approach is faring now, seventeen years later.


    Tabitha Villalba, Chandra Johnson (Extending the Class)
    College: Fresno City College
    Discipline: Tabitha Villalba, English, Learning Support; Chandra Johnson, ESL, Learning Support
    Contact Information: Tabitha Villalba  tabitha.villalba@fresnocitycollege.edu or 559-442-8209; Chandra Johnson  chandra.johnson@fresnocitycollege.edu or 559- 442-8209

    Background Statements: Tabitha Villalba is currently the Writing and Reading Center Coordinator at Fresno City College in Fresno, CA.  Fresno City College is the premier junior college in the state of California and serves over 25,000 students a semester.  The Writing and Reading Center at the college was established by a Title V grant in 2005 and has now been fully institutionalized serving close to 2,000 students per semester. Tabitha’s experience began as a writing tutor at California State University of Fresno.  Upon earning her Bachelor’s Degree in English and enrolling in the graduate program, she became a teaching associate at Fresno State instructing courses in remedial writing and English Composition.  While concurrently enrolled in composition theory and rhetoric courses, Tabitha earned a Master of Fine Arts degree in Creative Writing.   Since her start date in 2008, Tabitha has coordinated several services through the Writing and Reading including tutoring, supplemental instruction, workshops, and faculty presentations.  Tabitha also serves as a member of the Fresno City College Basic Skills Committee and has previously presented at a regional Basic Skills conference. Chandra Johnson is currently the ESL Coordinator in the Writing and Reading Center at Fresno City College in Fresno, CA.  She has worked for the center since January of 2009, providing additional tutorial training and faculty support.  She has a Bachelor of Arts in English and a Master of Arts in Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL).  She has twelve years experience teaching college students and adults at the community, college, and international level.  Before she became the ESL Coordinator at the writing center, she was the director of the Intensive English Language Program at Fresno Pacific University in Fresno, CA. Her knowledge and experience with ESL students has extended services greatly in the Writing and Reading Center, including supplemental instruction, language specific workshops, tutor training, and faculty presentations.  In collaboration with the Writing and Reading Center Coordinator, Chandra helped develop an embedded tutoring program for ESL students.  She currently reports to the Basic Skills Committee at Fresno City College.

    Program Description: Recently, the Writing and Reading Center developed an embedded tutoring program (Extending the Class or ETC) that is similar to the supplemental instruction model.  We began with a small pilot of two ESL courses that were also a learning community.  The courses were ESL reading and writing, one level below transfer-level English.  We had one tutor assigned to these courses who went through training that addressed the various academic needs of ESL students.  The tutor then attended the classes once a week, met with the instructors every other week, and provided tutoring 6 hours a week.  Attending tutoring was not required, yet nearly 60% of all students (17 out of 31) attended for a total of 112 visits to the center. This data does not reflect the entire semester because the pilot is still in progress.  However, we have noticed a significant difference in the number of visits and hours of the embedded tutoring participants compared to non-embedded tutoring ESL students.  Only 40% of ESL students attend tutoring, which is demonstrated by fewer visits and hours in the center.  Because our campus has a significantly low number of ESL students who not only persist toward transfer-level English, but who also pass the course, we decided that these students required more than just the traditional drop-in reading and writing tutoring.  Our plans are to continue to expand the program to all ESL developmental reading and writing courses by continuing to work closely with ESL faculty and the basic skills initiative.


    Laura Hope, Cindy Walker (Chaffey Success Centers)
    College: Chaffey College
    Discipline: Laura Hope, Dean of Instructional Support; Cindy Walker, Faculty Instructional Specialist, Language Success Center
    Contact Information: Laura Hope, mailto:laura.hope@chaffey.edu laura.hope@chaffey.edu or 909- 652-6136; Cindy Walker,  cindy.walker@chaffey.edu  or 909-652-6908

    Background Statements:  Laura Hope is currently the Interim Dean of Instructional Support at Chaffey College.  She oversees the Success Centers, the Library, Distance Education, Professional Development, Honors, the Catalog, and the Schedule of Classes as Interim Dean.  She served as a full-time English instructor for the past twenty years.  Before becoming a dean, she was one of the founding leaders of the Chaffey College Success Centers and served as their Coordinator for many years.  Ms. Hope has also pioneered Chaffey’s successful program at the California Institute for Women at Chino since its inception.  Cindy Walker has served as the Faculty Instructional Specialist in Chaffey College’s Success Centers since the year 2000.  She has also served as Coordinator of various programs (Modern Languages, ESL, and Reading) for the past six years and is currently the Faculty Tri-Chair of the Student Success Initiative at Chaffey College.  Before working at Chaffey College, she taught English as a Second Language and Reading at other colleges. 

    Program Description: In 1999 Chaffey College embarked upon a major initiative called the “Basic Skills Transformation” which incorporated a number of wide-ranging, integrated, and structural changes to revolutionize the educational delivery system of the college. Funded by Partnership for Excellence and motivated by an educational moral imperative to ensure that students move successfully through their course work, the Basic Skills Transformation incorporated a number of wide-ranging, integrated, and structural changes to revolutionize the educational delivery system of the college.  Although still an ongoing effort, the effort has affected budget, facilities, and organizational structures as well as assessment/placement, curriculum, instruction, academic support services, and staff development. The Transformation Project, in general, and the establishment of the Success Centers, in particular, have been some of the most successful enterprises in the college’s long history.  The presentation can vary from a one-hour to a full-day workshop, depending on the amount of information and application desired by the host-college.  The intended audience is faculty from all disciplines, administrators, learning center staff/directors, and counseling staff/faculty.


    Scott Weigan (The Writing Center)
    College: Los Angeles Valley College
    Discipline: English
    Contact Information: weigansm@lavc.edu or 818-947-2811,

    Background Statement:  Scott Weigan is the Director of The Writing Center, Basic Skills Coordinator, Assistant Professor in English, and Co-director of the STARS/FIPSE grant.

     


    CTE and Contextualized Learning

    Sandra Corona, Angie Stuart (“Contextualized Teaching and Learning in the Classroom: Linking a Subject Matter and ESL and Taking Your Students from Full Spanish to Full English Instruction”)
    College: Southwestern College
    Discipline: Sandra Corona, Child Development; Angelina Stuart, ESL
    Contact Information: Sandra Corona, scorona@swccd.edu or 619-421-6700, ext. 5615; Angelina Stuart, astuart@swccd.edu or 619-421-6700, ext. 5607

    Background Statements: Sandra Corona currently teaches at Southwestern College in Chula Vista, California, where she has taught Child Development since 1999. She has also been teaching at other universities in San Diego and internationally in Mexico.  The lead Child Development faculty member for the Spanish to English Program, a program recognized statewide in October 2008 by the Hewlett Foundation for program excellence, Sandra co-teaches at least one cohort with Angie Stuart, with whom she collaborates on program decisions, and is a very active member of the Child Development department.  Sandra holds a Bachelor’s degree in Educational Psychology and a Master’s degree in Bilingual Education and Cross-cultural Teaching as well as a Ph.D. in Education. In addition, she has attended Dr. Skip Downing’s On Course I Workshop, which focuses on learner-centered methodologies to promote student success, and was invited to present at the National On Course Conference in 2007. Sandra has been the recipient of the “2008-2009 Teaching Excellence Award” at Southwestern College and was given the “Outstanding Faculty Award” at Southwestern College’s Higher Educational Center at San Ysidro in 2002.  Angelina (Angie) Stuart currently teaches at Southwestern College in Chula Vista, California, where for 20 years she has taught Spanish (both for Native Speakers as well as traditional Spanish learners) and ESL.  Angie is the lead ESL faculty member for the Spanish to English Program, in which she co-teaches with Dr. Corona.  She has a BA and an MA in Spanish from San Diego State University, as well as a Multiple Subjects Teaching Credential for Bilingual Education in Primary Schools, a Language Development Specialist Certificate and several years of experience in teaching ESL at Southwestern College, The American Language Institute at SDSU Foundation and the San Diego Community College District, in addition to experience as a bilingual Kindergarten teacher.  This has given Angie a wide and varied background in language acquisition at all educational levels.  Additionally, having taken the On Course I & II Workshops, Angie has offered numerous staff development sessions as well as conference sessions around the theme of learner-centered methodologies at her own campus, at the Regional BSI Conference and the National On Course Conference.  Having taken coursework in content-based instruction, which supports the acquisition of academic ESL, Angie has experience in developing curriculum and has developed the ESL workbooks that support the Spanish to English program. 

    Program Description: The Spanish to English Child Development Associate Teacher’s Certificate Program at Southwestern College (loving termed by us as the “Spanish to English Program”) is a four semester cohort program designed to support Spanish speaking students who wish to obtain this certificate in order to work as a child care provider, a teacher’s aide or to further their studies as they gain English skills.  Students study academic college level Child Development material in 100% Spanish in the first semester utilizing the same college texts as the English only course.  As they study of the rest of the semesters, instruction in English increases incrementally so that by the end of the 4 semester program, the CD course is given in 100% English, hence the name “Spanish to English” Program.  The ESL courses are given in 100% English and are content-based.

    The Spanish to English program is a great VESL (vocational ESL) model which focuses on the Content Based Instruction (or CBI).  The presenters can offer suggestions on how to begin such a replicable program at other institutions or how to use it as a model for other vocations, such as Nursing, Automotive, etc.  The presenters can also offer effective teaching techniques for learning communities and for language acquisition as well as teacher training sessions.


    Maryanne Galindo, Jah’ Shams Abdul Mu’Min (“Contextualizing Soft Skills in the Utilities and Construction Prep Program”)
    College: LA Trade Tech
    Discipline: Maryanne Galindo and Jah’Shams Abdul-Mumin both teach in the Basic Skills & Career Advancement Academies (noncredit) and the Community Economic Development Department credit).
    Contact Information: Maryanne Galindo, maryannegalindo@sbcglobal.net  or 323-988-5721; Jah’Shams Abdul-Mumin,  jahshams@gmail.com or 323-988-5721

    Background Statements: Maryanne Galindo and Jah’Shams Abdul-Mumin are part of the Faculty Inquiry Network, a statewide network of eighteen community colleges. They teach in both the credit and noncredit program at LA Trade Tech.  In the Noncredit Department, they teach in the Basic Skills & Career Advancement Academies; in the Credit Department, they teach in the Community Economic Development Department.

    Program Description: This session will present a multidimensional and multicultural framework for creating learning spaces that increase student engagement, enhance emotional intelligence and support student success in academic and career pathways. The presenters will highlight critical thinking and visual thinking methods, communication and teambuilding tools, and various self-assessments that when used within the context of a learning community, make visible the invisible values, resiliency, motivations, strengths and leadership skills that would otherwise be hidden in a traditional classroom.


    Linda Collins (Career Ladders Project)
    College:  Los Medanos College
    Discipline: Sociology
    Contact Information: lcollins@careerladdersproject.org

    Background Statement: Linda Collins is the Executive Director of the Career Ladders Project. Linda has extensive experience with policy development and implementation in community colleges having worked closely with the Board of Governors for the California Community Colleges (CCC) to develop the statewide Ladders of Opportunity policy initiative. Linda served on the Steering Committee and subsequent implementation team of the new CCC Strategic Planning Initiative, and has represented the system on numerous state committees and policy task forces.

    Linda is frequently asked to consult on state and national policy efforts. She has most recently served on: California Tomorrow's Community College Advisory Board, the Policy Innovations Committee of the Bay Area Workforce Funding Collaborative, the Community College Sector Expansion Project of the National Network of Sector Practitioners, the Employment Task Force for the National Governor's Association Foster Youth Policy Academy, the Consumer-Directed Services Network Board, and the CA EDGE Campaign Steering Committee. Linda is a member of the newly formed Partnership for Strengthening Community Colleges (PSCC) convened by the Hewlett Foundation and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. Linda worked with the Chancellor's Office in developing the background concepts for the recently launched Career Advancement Academies statewide demonstration project. She is a member of the newly formed Golden State Institute that will serve as the state level advisory group to the Career Advancement Academies. Linda currently directs the Gateway Project that offers bridges to college and high wage careers for disconnected or disadvantaged youth and adults in six California counties.                                     Program Description: The Board of Governors of the California Community Colleges adopted a major policy statement calling for a comprehensive, statewide Career Ladders Initiative (Ladders of Opportunity: A Board of Governors' Initiative For Developing California's New Workforce).  Founded upon this framing document, the Career Ladders Project (CLP) aims to improve post-secondary career pathway access and completion for underserved populations. The CLP pursues policy initiatives and makes research based recommendations regarding career ladder programs in California community colleges. The CLP also provides strategic advice and technical assistance to community colleges and their workforce partners in building regional career pathway and bridge programs. Recent projects include work on the career pathway in process technologies for the energy, petrochemical, and water treatment employers in Contra Costa County, and the regional biotechnology career pathway system in the greater Bay Area. With the sponsorship of the Walter S. Johnson Foundation, the CLP is currently developing Gateway programs offering bridges to college and careers for disadvantaged youth and young adults in six California counties. The project researched and assessed the challenges and opportunities facing colleges and their regional workforce partners in developing career pathways. The project resulted in policy recommendations and an action plan to move the colleges and the state toward realization of the career ladders vision set forth in Ladders of Opportunity; these were incorporated into the new Strategic Plan adopted by the Board of Governors in January 2006. The CLP operates under the auspices of the Foundation for California Community Colleges, a 501(c)(3).


    Tammy Camacho (Career Advancement Academy)
    College: Fresno City College
    Discipline: Applied Technology
    Contact Information: tammy.camacho@fresnocitycollege.edu

    Background Statement: Tammy Camacho has been working in education for 14 years as a Coordinator, teacher, FFA Advisor, and Coach.  She is currently the Coordinator of the Career Advancement Academy at Fresno City College.  

    Program Description: The CAA program was designed to establish pipelines for under-prepared, underemployed young adults to careers and additional higher education opportunities. The CAAs address foundational skills in reading, writing, and mathematics, in the context of particular career pathways of importance to the regional economy.  The presentation will address how to effectively contextualize assignments and curriculum, toward the student’s career pathway, working individually or collaboratively, and how to utilize students’ help as a strong tool to improve and shape the contextualized curriculum/program. 


    Linking Student and Learning Support and Instruction

    Jerry Pike (“Linking Students, Tutors, and Instruction Using Directed Learning Activities”)
    College: Santa Barbara City College
    Discipline: English, learning support
    Contact Information: Pike@sbcc.edu or 805-965-0581, ext. 2673

    Background Statement: Dr. Pike is currently the Director of Learning Support Services at Santa Barbara City College. Early in his teaching career he ran the Writing Center at CSU, Chico which included training graduate student tutors. He earned a PhD in American Literature from UC Davis where he taught for several years. At Davis he also taught and oversaw graduate students who were new teachers of English. Dr. Pike came to Santa Barbara City College in 1991 where he taught English, worked as Director of Composition and then moved to his current position, which includes directing the Learning Skills Center, teaching and training tutors, coordinating Directed Learning Activities development, offering learning skills workshops, and working with students and faculty to foster individualized learning. He also oversees learning technology to supplement and complement instruction. He is a founding member of SBCC’s Partnership for Student Success beginning in 2005.

    Presentation Description: This workshop demonstrates how Directed Learning Activities (DLAs) can assist faculty in working with students in need of specific foundational skills development, regardless of the discipline.  Based on the Chaffey College model, DLAs assist faculty by extending classroom instruction into a tutorial environment in which tutors, with instructions from the faculty, work with students in their mastery of fundamental skills or concepts while completing the DLAs. DLAs are like worksheets with the critical dimension of tutorial mediation to help students acquire higher levels of comprehension and skill in application of foundational course content.  The goal of Dr. Pike’s workshop is that participants will contribute to a shared understanding of guiding principles that are transferable to the participants’ home campuses. The workshop is interactive and participants leave with a declared plan for implementation, including “first steps.”


    Herminio Hernando (De Anza’s Math Performance Success Program) 
    College: De Anza College
    Discipline: Counseling
    Contact information: hernandoherminio@fhda.edu 

    Background Statement: Herminio Hernando is a counselor/instructor and coordinator for the Math Performance Success Program at De Anza College.  He has been coordinator of the MPS Program and has taught and provided counseling services at De Anza for over 9 years.  Prior to De Anza, Herminio was a counselor/instructor at LaGuardia Community College and York College both of the City University of New York for nearly 10 years.  Herminio has extensive experience in teaching, counseling, and collaborative programs involving instruction and student services. 

    Presentation Description: The Math Performance Success Program (MPS) offers students a team approach to success, particularly for those who have had difficulty in previous math courses.  Instructors, counselors and tutor/mentors collaborate to help students complete their mathematics requirements from pre-algebra through university transfer statistics. Students in the MPS Program receive double the instruction time.  This instructional time provides both whole class activities as well as collaborative group work, with group work comprising about 50% of the instructional time.  The course instructors collaborate on the course instruction, using a common calendar, similar activities, and common tests.  Mentor/tutors are available during the class to assist students who have questions about the material.

    A counselor is available for each class section.  The counselor and instructor work closely to ensure student success.  The counselor is available daily during class to talk to students regarding their grade to date, missing assignments and absences.  The counselor provides individual and academic counseling for students in the program.  The MPS team of instructors and counselors meet on a weekly basis to plan program activities and discuss concerns related to students’ achievement in the class.

    The MPS Program at De Anza has received numerous awards over the years including The California Community College Academic Senate award for exemplary programs and the Hewlett Scholars award. 


    Marsha Elliott (“What About Noncredit?”; “Collaborations Between Noncredit and Credit for Improved Student Transitions and Success”; “Curricular Activism: New Ways to Help Students Succeed with Noncredit”) – North Orange CCD
    College: North Orange County CCD, School of Continuing Education (noncredit)       
    Discipline: Basic Skills, Disabled Students Program and Services                                       
    Contact Information: melliott@sce.edu or 714-995-9236                                            

    Background Statement: Marsha Elliott has been a faculty leader with the Disabled Students Program and Services, noncredit, for 14 years.  She is currently a faculty member in the Basic Skills/High School Diploma Program, also noncredit.  Over the last 15 years, she has been involved with noncredit basic skills instruction, curriculum development, and local and statewide basic skills initiatives.                                                    

    Program Description: The role of noncredit education is to be accessible, flexible and responsive to the needs of a diverse student population.  The presentation provides a general overview of noncredit programs in the California community college system with topics that cover various aspects of noncredit: the curriculum approval process, program development, current regulations, funding, instructional delivery, unique student needs and challenges, and building linkages with credit programs to encourage students to transition to college.


    Laura Hope, Cindy Walker (Chaffey Success Centers)
    College: Chaffey College
    Discipline: Laura Hope, Dean of Instructional Support; Cindy Walker, Faculty Instructional Specialist, Language Success Center
    Contact Information: Laura Hope, mailto:laura.hope@chaffey.edu laura.hope@chaffey.edu or 909- 652-6136; Cindy Walker,  cindy.walker@chaffey.edu  or 909-652-6908

    Background Statements:  Laura Hope is currently the Interim Dean of Instructional Support at Chaffey College.  She oversees the Success Centers, the Library, Distance Education, Professional Development, Honors, the Catalog, and the Schedule of Classes as Interim Dean.  She served as a full-time English instructor for the past twenty years.  Before becoming a dean, she was one of the founding leaders of the Chaffey College Success Centers and served as their Coordinator for many years.  Ms. Hope has also pioneered Chaffey’s successful program at the California Institute for Women at Chino since its inception.  Cindy Walker has served as the Faculty Instructional Specialist in Chaffey College’s Success Centers since the year 2000.  She has also served as Coordinator of various programs (Modern Languages, ESL, and Reading) for the past six years and is currently the Faculty Tri-Chair of the Student Success Initiative at Chaffey College.  Before working at Chaffey College, she taught English as a Second Language and Reading at other colleges. 

    Program Description: In 1999 Chaffey College embarked upon a major initiative called the “Basic Skills Transformation” which incorporated a number of wide-ranging, integrated, and structural changes to revolutionize the educational delivery system of the college. Funded by Partnership for Excellence and motivated by an educational moral imperative to ensure that students move successfully through their course work, the Basic Skills Transformation incorporated a number of wide-ranging, integrated, and structural changes to revolutionize the educational delivery system of the college.  Although still an ongoing effort, the effort has affected budget, facilities, and organizational structures as well as assessment/placement, curriculum, instruction, academic support services, and staff development. The Transformation Project, in general, and the establishment of the Success Centers, in particular, have been some of the most successful enterprises in the college’s long history.  The presentation can vary from a one-hour to a full-day workshop, depending on the amount of information and application desired by the host-college.  The intended audience is faculty from all disciplines, administrators, learning center staff/directors, and counseling staff/faculty.

     


    Assessment

    Darla Cooper (“Evaluation Is a Partnership”)
    College: RP Group, Center for Student Success
    Discipline: Institutional Research, Counseling
    Contact Information: dcooper@rpgroup.org

    Background Statement: Dr. Darla M. Cooper is currently the Associate Director of the Center for Student Success for the Research and Planning Group for the California Community Colleges.  Dr. Cooper has over 10 years of experience in community college research serving as the Director of Institutional Research at Santa Barbara City College, Oxnard College, and Ohlone College.  In her work as an institutional researcher, Dr. Cooper has worked with faculty both individually and at a department level to review and assess the impact of instruction and support services on student learning and outcomes.  Dr. Cooper recently won the Best Researcher-Teacher award from the ASCCC/RP SLO Assessment Collaborative for her work with the faculty at Santa Barbara.  Prior to coming to the community college system, Dr. Cooper worked as a counselor and researcher at the four-year level.

    Presentation Description: As educators, we are constantly striving to improve circumstances for our students by implementing new and innovative strategies to increase student success.  What sometimes is overlooked is the need to evaluate the effectiveness of these efforts to determine if a program is having the desired impact on students.  In this presentation, attendees will be presented with the argument that evaluation is not only an important part of program implementation, but it is best achieved through a partnership between faculty and researchers.  The presentation will follow the format used in the fall 2009 Coordinator Workshop.  Basic skills coordinators attending this workshop received a presentation that stressed the roles researchers and faculty can play and how they can help each other in the process, and how it is their successful relationship that produces the most useful results. The presentation also included discussions on the importance of achieving a balance between rigor and reality and a brief overview of direct and indirect measures.  During the session, faculty participated in an exercise where they discussed how to prepare to meet with their researcher to begin planning a program evaluation.   The session ended with a case study where faculty and their researcher from one college shared what actually happened when they began working together to evaluate a comprehensive and multifaceted program, the successes and challenges they encountered, and the lessons they all learned as a result. 


    Michelle Barton or Darla Cooper (“Classroom-based Research:  You Can Be a Researcher, Too!”)
    College: Palomar College; RP Group, Center for Student Success
    Discipline: Institutional Research
    Contact Information: Michelle Barton,  mbarton@palomar.edu; Darla Cooper, dcooper@rpgroup.org

    Background Statement: Michelle Barton has worked within the California Community College system for over 12 years. She is currently the Director of Institutional Research and Planning (IR&P) at Palomar Community College, a position she has held for over 8 years. Prior to working for the community colleges, Ms. Barton taught Psychology at San Diego State University.  She also worked for a government contractor to develop learning and skills assessments and training systems. Dr. Darla M. Cooper is currently the Associate Director of the Center for Student Success for the Research and Planning Group for the California Community Colleges.  Dr. Cooper has over 10 years of experience in community college research serving as the Director of Institutional Research at Santa Barbara City College, Oxnard College, and Ohlone College.  Dr. Cooper recently won the Best Researcher-Teacher award from the ASCCC/RP SLO Assessment Collaborative.  Prior to coming to the community college system, Dr. Cooper worked as a counselor and researcher at the four-year level. In their work as institutional researchers, Ms. Barton and Dr. Cooper work with faculty both individually and at a department level to review and assess the impact of instruction and support services on student learning and outcomes.  Ms. Barton and Dr. Cooper also worked as a team to provide technical research support to faculty participating in a statewide program designed to encourage the use of classroom-based research to evaluate the effectiveness of technology on student learning. 

    Presentation Description: Classroom-based research provides a process for evaluating the impact of strategies used in the classroom to improve student learning. Its focus moves from identifying a problem to researching the effectiveness of the solution.  It is one way for faculty to reflect upon their own practices in the classroom and how they address students’ needs. Faculty attending the recent basic skills workshops received a presentation on classroom-based research.  During the session, they learned about the benefits of conducting such research and reviewed several ways to carry out the process in their own courses.  These included determining research questions; identifying various approaches for conducting research in their classrooms; and learning about ways to collect, analyze, and present research data and information.  The presentation concluded with an interactive exercise where faculty defined approaches for evaluating the impact of instructional interventions in mathematics, English, and ESL courses. 

    Bob Pacheco (“Using the Best Evidence to Find Solutions That Make a Difference”)
    College: Barstow College
    Discipline: Reading, Director of Research
    Contact Information: RPacheco@barstow.edu or 760-252-2411, ext. 7253

    Background Statement: Robert Pacheco is Director of Research, Development and Planning and Accreditation Liaison Officer at Barstow College.  He is the Assessment Chair of the Executive Board of the RP Group of California.  Previously, Bob was a tenured faculty and a member of the California State Academic Senate Committee on SLOs and Accreditation.  He was an At-Large Representative in the college's Academic Senate and is a member of Barstow College’s Strategic Planning Committee, SLO Assessment Committee and the Matriculation Committee.  

    Presentation Description: Individual presentations will be tailored to the specific college needs in basic skills. Potential topics include: using meaningful evidence to make decisions, promoting faculty buy-in, fostering a culture of inquiry; evaluating programs using outcomes and student achievement information; creating and implementing effective assessment instruments; utilizing embedded assessment across disciplines, discovering alternative ways to assess student progress using portfolios, alternative instruction methods and technology (e.g., Kurzweil, Apple Inspiration).

    Janet Fulks (Implementing Course Level SLOs to Inform Grading)
    College: Bakersfield College
    Discipline: Biology and Education
    Contact Information: jfulks@bakersfieldcollege.edu or (661) 304-9641

    Background Statement: Dr. Janet Fulks has been part of the Basic Skills Initiative Project since Phase II. She has served as the ASCCC SLO and Accreditation Chair, Curriculum Chair, Basic Skills Chair and Noncredit Chair. She was the faculty representative on the ARCC Technical Assistance team, helped to develop and implement the CB 21 coding and training for all basic skills courses in the CCCs and organized noncredit faculty to address accountability issues in the noncredit world. Janet has been a part of two Hewlett Foundation Grants: Basic Skills Outcomes Capacity (BSOC) and Bridging Research Information and Culture (BRIC). Janet and her colleague Marcy Alancraig, from Cabrillo College, were the developers and editors of the Basic Skills Handbook

    Program Description:
    Student Learning Outcomes (SLOs) should guide our work and the assessment of student learning, particularly in basic skills where clearly communicated expectations and defined skills are essential. However, SLO assessment should be embedded in our everyday work, not an add-on or extra task. This program describes how to integrate SLOs into grading and course assessment in order to improve teaching and learning. This work has formed the basis of her own classroom experience for the last six years.

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